Train-care Maintenance Depots

Heating a space as large as a transport workshop, or large storage area, with frequently open loading bays can be costly and often ineffective. Reznor has designed a flexible range of solutions to help you optimise the HVAC environment in your space and achieve cost efficiency.

Reznor Train Depot

Solutions Overview

To reduce costs and ensure a comfortable environment, destratification fans can push rising heat back down to ground level, avoiding wasted warmth and reducing the amount of energy needed to heat the space. Air curtains create a barrier of air in doorways, which stops heat escaping and also prevents the ingress of insects and outdoor debris. If the space is particularly large and colleagues only inhabit certain areas, radiant heating can be an effective way of reducing costs. Radiant heaters are usually suspended from the ceiling and provide heat only to specific areas, reducing costs by not wasting energy heating unnecessary areas.

Orient Express Case Study

Stewarts Lane railway depot in Battersea has been providing maintenance and stabling for the South East of England’s rolling stock since 1862 and was, at one point, the largest locomotive capacity in the Southern region. The facility has provided a service to London and its southern arterial rail system through two world wars, the steam days, nationalisation, electrification and privatisation. Having stabled the Royal Train, one of the depots main uses today is for the maintenance of the prestigious Orient Express.

After the installation of a Nor-Ray-Vac system in the high bay and main locomotive shed at Orient Express 28 years ago, the system needed to be replaced. Orient Express approached Multigas and asked them to assist with the replacement of the existing and also an additional two areas that  were previously unheated.

Entrance and exit doors often occupy the full width of the building and may be left open for many hours a day.  When doors are open at both ends, a wind tunnel effect is created, cold air at high velocity is drawn into the shed.  Keeping the shed warm enough for employees to work comfortably is compounded by the often north-south alignment of the tracks, which allows very little sunshine to warm the interior.

Reznor was able to offer the ideal heating and most effective and economic heating solution.  Blanket heat coverage was not a necessity in the rail shed as only the areas where personnel are working needed to be heated.  When operatives are working on one part of the train, zoning enables all other parts of the radiant heating system to be switched off.  Over time this produces considerable fuel economies and cost reductions.

Economy and effectiveness were the two key criteria specified to be answered when selecting the heating system for the rail maintenance shed.  Finding a solution to both in a single heating system can be challenging.  One form of space heating technology, ideally suited to this cold and inhospitable working environment is the Nor-Ray-Vac radiant tube heating system.

Reznor replaced the old system with the latest Nor-Ray-Vac series system which was happily received by the client due to the past financial benefits of this type of heating system within a train depot environment.

Orient Express NRV

The project was completed in three stages.  Phases One and Two are where the complete rebuild of the carriages takes place for the Orient Express trains and were previously unheated bays.  Phase One, an area of; 41m x 15m and 7m high saw the installation of Nor-Ray-Vac system consisting of 6 x 24kW burners with one flue discharge.  Phase Two, an area of; 30m x 15m and 7m high saw the installation of a Nor-Ray-Vac system consisting of 6 x 18kW burners with one flue discharge.

Phase Three was the high and main locomotive shed where the steam locomotives are maintained on a regular basis. The Nor-Ray-Vac sytem was an exact replacement of the original to minimise the installation costs. The client was more than happy to replace the old system with the latest NRV series having experienced the financial benefits of an efficient radiant heating system within a train depot environment. The high bay of area; 30m x 20m and 12m high a Nor-Ray-Vac system of 10 x 18kW burners with on flue discharge was installed going around the perimteter of the bay, below the crane beam. The main locomotive of area; 77m x 15m and 7m high received a Nor-Ray-Vac system consisting of 18 x 18kW burners arranged in three zones with two flue discharges.

The Nor-Ray-Vac system combusts the fuel at the point of use enabling maximum efficiency with no distribution losses and has rapid response to changed conditions. It is uniquely designed to accommodate the building constraints and required zoning for the method of working within the shed. The flexibility of the radiant heating system meant that specific areas can be heated as required by the work patterns within the shed keeping the staff warm.

Network Rail, Botanical Gardens Depot Case Study

Hull Botantical Gardens LMD is a fuelling point that carries out train ‘A’ examinations overnight.  The depot is staffed by six level five fitters and three maintenance assistants along with six cleaners based at the depot, with the night shift being the busiest and coldest shift.  As the majority of the work is carried out overnight and large doorways remain open for long periods, operatives were working in single figure temperatures, particularly in the colder winter months.

With the rail shed being unheated and night time being the busiest shift, a new heating system was paramount importance to Network Rail. Comfortable working temperatures and greater control over energy management prompted an investment in Nor-Ray-Vac continuous radiant tube heating from Reznor.

The train depot at Hull Botanical Gardens in 99m long, 16m wide and has two train tracks running through the length of the shed with two roof heights of 7 metres and 11 metres. It now benefits from the Nor-Ray-Vac system of 19 burners with ducted fresh air supply due to the diesel fumes from the engines, arranged in six temperature zones with just four discharge fans, to give the client economic flexibility of working. Suspended from the roof, the heaters emit infra-red rays that warm only objects and people in its path. They do not waste fuel heating the volume of air in the building. This will ensure that Network Rails heating costs are kept to a minimum.

The entrance and exit doors often occupy the full width of rail shed buildings and may be left open for many hours a day. When doors are open at both ends, a wind tunnel effect is created and cold air at high velocity is drawn into the shed. The problem of keeping the shed warm enough for personnel to work comfortably is compounded by the north-south alignment of the tracks which is a severe problem at night when there is no sunshine to warm the interior.

The Nor-Ray-Vac system provides even heat coverage throughout the building, with rapid warm up time and low noise operation.

Economy and effectiveness are the two key criteria specifiers required to answer when selecting a heating system for rail maintenance sheds. Finding a solution to both in a single heating system can be challenging. However one form of space heating technology is ideally suited to this cold and often inhospitable working environment – Nor-Ray-Vac radiant tube heating.

Low operating costs are achieved by concentrating the heat at low level, where it is most needed, without heating the volume of air in the building. Rapid response times reduce running costs further. Such flexibility means that warmth is felt by people in the building within minutes of start-up and no fuel is wasted bringing the air to comfortable temperature. Since the Reznor radiant system burns fuel at point of use, there are no distribution losses to take into account.

Emeg successfully removed the redundant system and installed the Nor-Ray-Vac system producing a comfortable working environment for operatives, especially those working the night shift.

Making Tracks For The Future Of HS2

HS2 will create thousands of jobs during its construction process as well as 2000 apprenticeships. Approximately 25,000 people are needed to build the project and to support this, Network Rail are providing two state of the art colleges to train the next generation of rail engineers, located in Birmingham and Doncaster.  The new pool of talent will all need to understand the challenges involved in HS electric railways of the future rather than the steam and diesels of the past.  Nick Winton Divisional Manager for Reznor explains what the next generation need to know regarding the heating of train sheds.

What to Consider When Heating a Rail Shed

Train maintenance sheds are invariably very long and narrow with large doors opening constantly at each end, thus notoriously difficult to heat and even more difficult to keep warm. The doors often occupy the full width of the building and may be left open for many hours a day, thus creating a wind tunnel effect and cold air at high velocity is drawn through the shed. This means that air infiltration can severely disrupt comfort conditions within the interior. A heating system needs to be able to sustain a comfortable environment in these conditions and especially provide rapid recovery once the doors are closed. Air curtains over or to the side of the doors, either ambient or heated can mitigate the issue of air infiltration at the doors.

Radiant Heating

The objective of a radiant heating system is to ensure that the people in the building are comfortably warm. By the correct application of a radiant heating system comfort levels can be optimised. Radiant heat warms objects and surfaces, increasing the mean radiant temperature and reducing the body’s loss of heat to its surroundings. In addition by eliminating air movement, convective loss of heat from the body will also be reduced.

 

How Heating Specifications Differ

Steam Loco Sheds

Due to the nature of the locomotive, vast amounts of steam are released, captured by massive hoods and released to atmosphere. When designing a heating system account of these hoods in the roof space is critical.

  1. The majority of work undertaken on these locos is at low level, ensuring heat between the tracks on the platform and in the pits is vital.
  2. Nor-Ray-Vac, due to its unique long lengths of radiant emitter is an ideal solution for heating the long distances between trains.
  3. Some rail sheds are in excess of 300m in length. Due to the physical size of the sheds, the design of the heating system is paramount to ensure optimum zoning capabilities, both for client operational flexibility to minimise running costs and to ensure the capability of being able to rapidly respond to changed conditions.

Diesel Loco Sheds

Many of these sheds derive from the steam era and consequently some still lack good insulation values for the fabric. Diesel locos also have hoods to collect the diesel fumes from the engines, but due to the general atmosphere within these sheds the radiant heating system has to be designed to have ducted fresh air supply from outside to the gas burners.  Again, the above points 1 to 3 are relevant to heating these sheds.

Electric Loco Sheds (power via 3rd rail)

These sheds tend to be cleaner due to the lack of diesel fumes and do not require ducted air to the gas burners of a radiant heating system. The work on these trains is primarily at low level, so again the above points 1 to 3 are relevant to heating these sheds.

Electric HS Loco Sheds (overhead power)

These sheds are primarily new facilities, in which case they are well insulated. Again due to the cleanliness within the sheds compared to diesels, there is no requirement for ducted air to the gas burners of the radiant heating system. Unlike the previous types of locos,

has to be undertaken on top of the loco to maintain the power unit.  These sheds have personnel staging for access to the top of the trains. When designing a radiant heating system for such facilities, due regard of the staging has to be taken into account. The radiant emitter cannot be too close to the working area above the trains.

Evidence of Success

Amongst other successful traincare applications Reznor were able to provide the ideal heating solution for the National College for High Speed Rail at Doncaster. Radiant heat (Nor-Ray-Vac) was specified as the heating system for the Large Scale Workshop comprising an area of 1,906m2 within the facility.

Hs2 Educational College Doncaster

HS2 will create thousands of jobs during its construction process as well as 2000 apprenticeships. Approximately 25,000 people are needed to build the project and to support this, Network Rail were able to provide two state of the art colleges to train the next generation of rail engineers, located in Birmingham and Doncaster.  The new pool of talent will all need to understand the challenges involved in HS electric railways of the future rather than the steam and diesels of the past.

High Speed 2 (HS2) is one of the largest infrastructure projects that this country has ever seen – six times the budget of the 2012 Olympics. It will provide a new high-speed railway link between London, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds, speeding up journeys, releasing space on crowded lines and bringing Britain closer together.

Network Rail’s high speed rail colleges will be elite institutions, defined by their focus on progression to a higher level of study – delivering truly innovative training and offering the very best in teaching and specialist equipment.

The ways in which train care depots are utilised, often intermittently and at irregular time intervals, make the efficient use of energy extremely difficult. Therefore, consideration must be given to selecting a heating system that offers flexibility of operation at optimum efficiency.

The following factors represent some of the prime considerations when assessing the impact of any heating solution in a train care environment:

Train maintenance sheds are invariably very long and narrow with large doors opening constantly at each end, thus notoriously difficult to heat and even more difficult to keep warm. The doors often occupy the full width of the building and may be left open for many hours a day, thus creating a wind tunnel effect and cold air at high velocity is drawn through the shed. This means that air infiltration can severely disrupt comfort conditions within the interior. A heating system needs to be able to sustain a comfortable environment in these conditions and especially provide rapid recovery once the doors are closed. Air curtains over or to the side of the doors, either ambient or heated can mitigate the issue of air infiltration at the doors.

Maintenance is frequently carried out at night thus compounding the inhospitable climatic conditions and with partial occupation, it is therefore important for efficient use of energy, that the heating system can be easily and effectively zone controlled.

The mass of a train is considerable, when a cold and wet train enters the shed it creates a cold sink, the heating system needs to be able to provide rapid response to changed conditions.

Reznor were able to provide the ideal heating solution for the National College for High Speed Rail at Doncaster. Radiant heat (Nor-Ray-Vac) was specified as the heating system for the Large Scale Workshop comprising an area of 1,906m2 within the facility.

The College has been built on a ready to go 5.1 acre site at Doncasters Lakeside. As an elite institution, the college will be a flagship facility for advanced and higher level apprentices, as well as providing opportunities for the existing workforce to learn new skills in the latest technology, meeting the wider economic need for an increased supply in engineers and will therefore have a purpose beyond the timeframes of HS2.

Reznor Are On The Right Track

As part of a multi million pound project between Transport for London and Bombardier Transport, to deliver 65 new trains for Crossrail, Nortek Reznor were appointed to install an effective and economic heating solution for a new train facility in Derby.

The rail contract covered the supply, delivery and maintenance of 65 new trains, which will be manufactured and assembled at Bombardier’s plant in Derby.  The first newly designed train is expected to be delivered in May 2017, this will support 760 manufacturing jobs plus 80 apprenticeships and it is estimated that 74% of the contract spend will remain in the UK economy.

The new factory in Derby is situated on Bombardier’s Litchurch Lane site and will be used for the production of Crossrail trains.  The design of the 10,400m2 building features a 250m long testing hangar for up to four complete trains and office space for up to 90 staff.

Reznor, were able to provide the ideal heating solution for the new train facility.  Nick Winton, Divisional Manager for Reznor said “Keeping energy efficiency in mind, with large constantly open doors, train maintenance sheds, factories and other rail facilities are notoriously difficult to heat and even more difficult to keep warm. With the need to heat the platforms and a requirement for low maintenance energy efficiency, the Nor-Ray-Vac continuous gas fired radiant tube heating system was ideal.”

The installation of the Nor-Ray-Vac system avoided the significant wasted energy associated with heating vast internal spaces suffering from fluctuating temperatures, a perfect solution for rail sheds.  The system design layout at this proposed building provides heat along each platform between the trains, which has an estimated fuel saving of up to 40% over equivalent warm air systems.

Reznor worked alongside Emeg Electrical contractors on the radiant design.  A total of 40 x 46LR burners were suspended at 7.8m above the platforms with six flued discharge points being chosen and arranged in five branches across the width of the train facility providing ten operational temperature zones.

The way in which the burner/system has been designed along the each walkway will allow optimum zoning capabilities both for client operational flexibility to maximize running costs and ensures the capability of being able to rapidly respond to changed conditions.  Personnel will also feel comfortably warm at all times while the intense chill is taken off the trains preventing the build up of potentially hazardous condensation.

The 40m wide, newly designed facility is capable of handling four ten-carriage trains and its thermal enclosure means it will be energy efficient, the roof-light panels provide plenty of natural daylight and the building itself will be very low maintenance.